Stories in Places: Putting Louisville's History in Context

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Consultation has concluded

We need YOUR stories, to help put Louisville’s history in context!

The City has hired a historical research firm to compile information about Louisville’s residential development, commercial development, and industrial development, from the city’s birth in 1878 to the present. We invite you to share your histories, factoids, and photographs about Louisville’s families, houses, business owners, stores, restaurants, farms, mines, and railroads in order to ensure that we tell the whole story of this place. We want to uncover some new gems of information and create a legacy of documentation for future generations.

We also want to hear your thoughts:

We need YOUR stories, to help put Louisville’s history in context!

The City has hired a historical research firm to compile information about Louisville’s residential development, commercial development, and industrial development, from the city’s birth in 1878 to the present. We invite you to share your histories, factoids, and photographs about Louisville’s families, houses, business owners, stores, restaurants, farms, mines, and railroads in order to ensure that we tell the whole story of this place. We want to uncover some new gems of information and create a legacy of documentation for future generations.

We also want to hear your thoughts:

What do you find most fascinating about Louisville’s history?

What parts of Louisville’s history would you like to know more about?

How do you view the changes you’ve seen in Louisville over the last 50 years?

What kind of city would you like for Louisville to become over the next 10 years?

What do you think should be the future of Louisville’s history and historical buildings?

In addition to gathering information via this webpage, the City hosted an interactive kick-off event to discuss these topics in person on March 3, 2017.

Help us make Louisville’s history and ever-developing modern identity come alive by sharing your information and perspectives with us!

Tell your story

Thank you for adding to Louisville's story!

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.
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    Louisville’s English Roots (Louisville Historian, Fall 2012)

    by BSolek, over 3 years ago

    Many of the English residents came from those parts of England that were coal mining areas and industrial towns and cities, including those in the counties of Durham, Cumbria, and Northumberland

    in the north of England, Lancashire, as well as the West Midlands. Their family names were Dixon, Thirlaway, Wardle, Kimber, Barker, Lawrence, Smith, Carlton, Ashburn, Mitchell, Liddle, Nixon, Bowes, Harris, Carveth, Dalby, Thomas, Duffy, Atkin, Simpson, Palmer, Hilton, and many others.

    The areas of County Durham that many Louisville families came from included Wingate, Deaf Hill, and “the Trimdons,” which were made up of original Trimdon, Trimdon Grange, Trimdon... Continue reading

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    Bert Niehoff (Louisville Historian, Spring 2013)

    by BSolek, over 3 years ago

    Louisville’s passion for the sport of baseball dates from early on in the mining town’s history and the town boasts a number of ball players who’ve gone on to pursue a career in professional baseball, following in the footsteps of Louisville native Bert Niehoff.

    Bert Niehoff played for the Philadelphia Phillies from 1915 to 1918.

    Like many young ballplayers in Louisville, who are inspired by their dreams of someday being called up to play in the big league, Bert Niehoff perfected his baseball skills as a boy playing in sandlot games and on the city’s historic Miners Field. With a... Continue reading

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    Fear Rules Cities and Fight is On at Louisville Mines" (Louisville Historian Winter 2014)

    by BSolek, over 3 years ago

    The 100th Anniversary of the Northern Coal Field War and the Battle at the Hecla

    By Ron Buffo

    April of 2014 marks the 100th anniversary of the climax of a statewide coal mine labor dispute in

    Colorado that culminated in the well-known Ludlow Massacre in Southern Colorado and the lesser known Northern Field conflict at the Hecla and other mines in Louisville, Superior, and Lafayette.

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    Main Street Memories (Louisville Historian Spring 2015)

    by BSolek, over 3 years ago

    Lots of people's stories in this edition of Louisville Historian. I didn't finish the copy/paste/editing to make this story flow but you can access this newsletter on line in the history program web page on the Louisville library website.

    Louisville is lucky to have Main Street. Called Second Street on the original 1878 town plat, it served as one of the two north-south commercial streets. In 1897 when the town restricted saloons to Front Street, Main Street became the civic hub, attracting city hall, banks, theaters, restaurants, social centers, and businesses. Today it remains a vibrant locus for business, dining... Continue reading

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    Parbois Family (Louisville Historian Fall 2016)

    by BSolek, over 3 years ago

    R emnants of our community’s history, many of them long-forgotten, are all around us. One such indication of a person from the past is the Louisville street sign for Parbois Lane. The sign marks a lane going south from Elm Street between Main and Front, just south of Sweet Cow Ice Cream and Lucky Pie Pizza at 637 Front Street. Where does the name Parbois come from, and is it connected to Louisville’s French community? And what is the relevance of the Parbois name to that particular location?

    Desire Parbois was one... Continue reading

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    Ted & Carolyn Manzanares (from Louisville Historian, Winter 2016)

    by BSolek, over 3 years ago

    Carolyn was born in Boulder, Colorado, and her parents were Vince Mangus and Flora Parise Mangus. Carolyn lived and grew up in her family’s home at 500 Spruce Street in Louisville with her two brothers, Vince and Bill, and her younger sister, Nancy. Her father, Vince Mangus, was born in Louisville to his parents who came to Louisville from Italy. Her grandfather Mangus tried to work in the coal mines but for some reason could not, so he opened a clothing store, which was located on at the corner of Main and Spruce... Continue reading

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    Anthony Joseph "Joe" Madonna

    by BSolek, over 3 years ago

    Please see the Winter 2017 Louisville Historian newsletter for a the story of this influential Louisville citizen. This issue of the newsletter is not loaded on the city website yet, but the story is really good and should be included in this project.