Future 42 Public Engagement

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**The engagement period has been extended until April 15, 2022**

The City of Lafayette and the City of Louisville invite residents and commuters to share their feedback on the Future of State Highway 42 during Phase 2 of the Future 42 Project.

In May 2021, over 100 members of our communities shared their thoughts on the future of Highway 42 Corridor (also known as 95th Street or Courtesy Road) in Lafayette and Louisville for people who walk, wheel, ride transit, or drive.

Residents and commuters may now offer feedback on the three alternatives that have been developed for each intersection along the Highway 42 Corridor. Residents and commuters will have the opportunity to evaluate each alternative indicating what elements they prefer.

Although this project was conceived prior to the devastating effects of the Marshall Fire, planning for the future is now more important than ever. As Louisville seeks state and federal funding to help with the rebuilding of the city, it’s essential that plans consider both the current and future needs of residents and commuters as we invest in our transportation infrastructure to ensure public safety and mobility.

Gathering feedback from both Lafayette and Louisville residents and commuters helps us meet their needs and we are grateful to everyone who takes the time to share their feedback.

Mayor JD Mangat, City of Lafayette

Mayor Ashley Stolzmann, City of Louisville

Welcome! Do you live, work, or play along the State Highway 42 corridor? Do you have some ideas for the future of this critical connection? You're in the right place. The Cities of Lafayette and Louisville are working together to envision the future of State Highway 42 (also known as 95th Street, CO-42, or Courtesy Road) for people who walk, bike, ride transit, or drive. We want to hear from you about your experiences and ideas for the future of this important corridor.

Please be sure to subscribe to project updates to be the first to know about upcoming events and project updates.

Future 42 Corridor Study Area


Drop In Event (2022)

Thursday, April 14, 2022, 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Louisville Recreation & Senior Center, 900 Via Appia

Speak to the Project Team and complete a paper survey.

Paper Survey (2022)

You can collect a paper copy of the survey at City Hall (749 Main Street). Paper surveys are due back to City Hall (box between the glass doors) by April 15. Or complete the Online Survey.

Community Workshop #2 (2022)

Online Workshop - February 14 - April 15, 2022

This virtual workshop is designed to provide an opportunity for community members to offer feedback on the three alternatives that have been developed for each intersection along the Highway 42 Corridor. Participants will have the opportunity to evaluate each alternative indicating what elements they connect with and which ones they dislike. All feedback will be used to guide the planning team's selection of a recommended alternative.

  1. Online Q and A Event - February 24, 2022 5-7 PM - During the live event the community will have the opportunity to interact with the project team and ask questions.
  2. Online Survey - a survey gives an opportunity to give feedback on each intersections alternatives (Closes April 15)
  3. Drop a Line - Post general questions for the planning team about the corridor or the planning/design process.

Click here to see the summary of what we heard during Community Workshop #2.

Community Workshop #1 (2021)

Online Workshop - May 17-31, 2021

Thank you to the 100+ community members who participated in the Future 42 online workshop. This was the first opportunity for the community to share their thoughts about the corridor. The 2 week workshop was designed to give the community an opportunity to answer questions and provide feedback on how they use the corridor, what do they like/dislike about the corridor, and their vision for the future of the corridor.

There were multiple ways to share thoughts voice during the online workshop including:

  1. Live Q & A Event - May 19, 2021 - Thank you to those who joined the live Q & A Event on May 19. During the live event the community was able to have the opportunity to interact with the project team and ask questions. Spanish interpretation was provided.
  2. Survey (This survey is now closed) – Brief survey on your experiences, perceptions and priorities for the corridor.
  3. Corridor Map (This survey is now closed) – Place pins on the map of the corridor to share what you like, dislike, and ideas for the future of the corridor or explore the map and see what others in the community think about the corridor. (This survey is closed)
  4. Drop a line – Post general questions for the planning team about the corridor or the planning/design process.

Click here to see the summary of what we heard during Community Workshop #1.

**The engagement period has been extended until April 15, 2022**

The City of Lafayette and the City of Louisville invite residents and commuters to share their feedback on the Future of State Highway 42 during Phase 2 of the Future 42 Project.

In May 2021, over 100 members of our communities shared their thoughts on the future of Highway 42 Corridor (also known as 95th Street or Courtesy Road) in Lafayette and Louisville for people who walk, wheel, ride transit, or drive.

Residents and commuters may now offer feedback on the three alternatives that have been developed for each intersection along the Highway 42 Corridor. Residents and commuters will have the opportunity to evaluate each alternative indicating what elements they prefer.

Although this project was conceived prior to the devastating effects of the Marshall Fire, planning for the future is now more important than ever. As Louisville seeks state and federal funding to help with the rebuilding of the city, it’s essential that plans consider both the current and future needs of residents and commuters as we invest in our transportation infrastructure to ensure public safety and mobility.

Gathering feedback from both Lafayette and Louisville residents and commuters helps us meet their needs and we are grateful to everyone who takes the time to share their feedback.

Mayor JD Mangat, City of Lafayette

Mayor Ashley Stolzmann, City of Louisville

Welcome! Do you live, work, or play along the State Highway 42 corridor? Do you have some ideas for the future of this critical connection? You're in the right place. The Cities of Lafayette and Louisville are working together to envision the future of State Highway 42 (also known as 95th Street, CO-42, or Courtesy Road) for people who walk, bike, ride transit, or drive. We want to hear from you about your experiences and ideas for the future of this important corridor.

Please be sure to subscribe to project updates to be the first to know about upcoming events and project updates.

Future 42 Corridor Study Area


Drop In Event (2022)

Thursday, April 14, 2022, 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Louisville Recreation & Senior Center, 900 Via Appia

Speak to the Project Team and complete a paper survey.

Paper Survey (2022)

You can collect a paper copy of the survey at City Hall (749 Main Street). Paper surveys are due back to City Hall (box between the glass doors) by April 15. Or complete the Online Survey.

Community Workshop #2 (2022)

Online Workshop - February 14 - April 15, 2022

This virtual workshop is designed to provide an opportunity for community members to offer feedback on the three alternatives that have been developed for each intersection along the Highway 42 Corridor. Participants will have the opportunity to evaluate each alternative indicating what elements they connect with and which ones they dislike. All feedback will be used to guide the planning team's selection of a recommended alternative.

  1. Online Q and A Event - February 24, 2022 5-7 PM - During the live event the community will have the opportunity to interact with the project team and ask questions.
  2. Online Survey - a survey gives an opportunity to give feedback on each intersections alternatives (Closes April 15)
  3. Drop a Line - Post general questions for the planning team about the corridor or the planning/design process.

Click here to see the summary of what we heard during Community Workshop #2.

Community Workshop #1 (2021)

Online Workshop - May 17-31, 2021

Thank you to the 100+ community members who participated in the Future 42 online workshop. This was the first opportunity for the community to share their thoughts about the corridor. The 2 week workshop was designed to give the community an opportunity to answer questions and provide feedback on how they use the corridor, what do they like/dislike about the corridor, and their vision for the future of the corridor.

There were multiple ways to share thoughts voice during the online workshop including:

  1. Live Q & A Event - May 19, 2021 - Thank you to those who joined the live Q & A Event on May 19. During the live event the community was able to have the opportunity to interact with the project team and ask questions. Spanish interpretation was provided.
  2. Survey (This survey is now closed) – Brief survey on your experiences, perceptions and priorities for the corridor.
  3. Corridor Map (This survey is now closed) – Place pins on the map of the corridor to share what you like, dislike, and ideas for the future of the corridor or explore the map and see what others in the community think about the corridor. (This survey is closed)
  4. Drop a line – Post general questions for the planning team about the corridor or the planning/design process.

Click here to see the summary of what we heard during Community Workshop #1.

Q and A

Ask any questions about the corridor or the planning/design process and we will try to answer them as soon as we can. Thanks!

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    How does the plan comply with and support the Boulder County Transportation Master Plan, its five goals and eight measures?

    Cyclists 4 Community, 501c3 asked 4 months ago

    Future 42 aligns and furthers Boulder county's goals as laid out in their Transportation Master Plan (TMP). 

    Below you will find some of the key alignments with Transportation Master Plan...

    "Focus on operational improvements – including vehicle capacity expansion – at intersections. This can include additional turn lanes and through lanes. [Included within Strategies 1 & 3] " (Boulder County TMP) 

    Future 42 achieves this through the redesign of the intersections 


    'Improve intersections to assist with user safety and convenient access to transit stops and bike and pedestrian facilities " (Boulder County TMP) 

    All three intersection alternatives create a much safer environment for all road users then the current alignment. 


    "Prioritize roadway safety, signage and shoulder improvements to address unsafe conditions on primary on-road cycling corridors that separate bikes from cars and lower bicycle level of stress " (Boulder County TMP) 

    The addition of safe and protected bike lanes along CO-42 further this goal. 


    "Add/improve shoulders, multiuse path and trail connections, bike and pedestrian infrastructure to provide safe and convenient connections to transit facilities and park-n-rides " (Boulder county TMP) 

    This is achieved through including future BRT facility considerations as part of the plan

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    Developers need to own the expense of the infrastructure capacity improvements that their needs force upon existing property owners who have already paid for the rest of the infrastructure (water & wastewater treatment facilities, intersections, schools, etc.). And, yes, Redtail "Do-It-For-The-Children" Ridge, I'm talking about you. If the residents of Kestrel and Balfour (or businesses along 42) need improved access, let them choose to live elsewhere until the owners of those properties see the financial necessity to invest in the infrastructure improvements that should have been factored into their original purchase (caveat emptor). The rest of the community should not be forced to pay the cost of their poor foresight.

    Jerry asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your comments. We will be sure to document them moving forward.  

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    Vehicular traffic will perpetually increase to consume whatever capacity we build. Let the other communities fund the through-ways to support their expansion. Why should Louisville residents invest in more capacity just to make it more desirable for others to build outside of our community and have an easy way to pass through it? Another city can build the capacity, these commuters can go around Louisville, and we'll be all the better for it.

    Jerry asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your comments. We will be sure to document them moving forward.  

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    I think bike lanes, as shown in Alternative 2, are a waste of money. I'm unwilling to mix with vehicular traffic using the bike lanes on Cherry St. (a much lower volume, 35 mph zone). Under no circumstance would I do so on 42. Given the travel time estimates for Alternatives 1 & 3 vs. "no improvements", I have to ask, "Why pursue this project any further? Don't we have better uses for our tax dollars and the planning/management time of our city's staff?" I'd rather see a multi-use path developed away from the road where the pedestrian and cyclist experience would be safer and more enjoyable.

    Jerry asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your comments. We will be sure to document them moving forward.  

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    The "Online Workshop #1 Summary" indicates ~70% use vehicles for "How do you most use the corridor?" while "64% of respondents thought bicycle, micro-mobility, and pedestrian infrastructure needed transformative changes". If a significant majority use vehicles, why do a (weak) majority of respondents want non-vehicle improvements?

    DES asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your comments. We will be sure to document them moving forward.  

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    In my survey answers, I probably come off as a big proponent of roundabouts, which I'm not sure I am for busy thoroughfares like CO42, but there is no arguing that they have their pluses. I think one of my biggest concerns aside from overall throughput is that most Colorado drivers seem to be very ignorant of the rules of the road and I am concerned about failure to yield. I wonder whether that is fully represented in the collision reduction stats. I find the pedestrian options in Louisville to be about as unimaginative as can be. Very little provision for periodic seating (to a lesser extent on the trails). We elderly don't have the stamina we used to and a little spot to sit and rest is most welcome, and none of us are getting any younger. I also wonder whether any consideration was given to having the bike and pedestrian space in the center of the road making a boulevard. For most of the stretches of CO42, there is virtually no entry/exit to a sidewalk (now mostly non-existent) except at intersections, so it's not as though people need access to the fenced in yards that are present on a good portion of this. The commercial zones may be an exception to this. I'm also a proponent of making the walkways more interesting - straight lines are a bore. When I vacation in Flamingos/Nuevo Vallarta, I walk between my resort and a commercial area in NV, about 14 miles round trip. In the Flamingos section, straight lines and boring, but when you hit the city limits of NV, suddenly the walkways weave like vines among the palms. Each time you come to a bus stop or a resort entrance, there is a seating area and bike parking, usually. At intervals, there are electric bike stands where you can pick up or drop off an bike. (The walks are shared with the bikes). OK, I get it, we're not a resort, but if we are going to be multi-modal, I think more consideration needs to be given to the walks and the bike paths, including periodic repair stands. Also a center space provides for our future elevated monorail from points south to Longmont.

    SquareState asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for your comments. We will be sure to document them moving forward.  

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    What are the cost comparisons of the alternatives?

    MoCro asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for taking the time to provide feedback. Cost comparisons and saving will be addressed in future phases of the project.  

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    I would encourage you to plan for the future. Traffic is only going to increase in coming years. I think this means making this corridor 4 lanes of traffic plus right-turn lanes and left-turn lanes at every major intersection. Currently, this corridor keeps going back and forth from 4 lanes to 2 lanes at multiple places. This is dangerous since cars keep having to merge when it goes down to 2 lanes. Currently, the biggest traffic issue that I encounter is backed-up traffic going south from South Boulder Road to Pine at rush hour. I think it is great to make this area more friendly for pedestrians and bicycles (I've walked and bicycled it multiple times and am well aware of its limitations), but please be realistic -- 99+% of the traffic is by vehicles, not pedestrians and bicycles, so the emphasis needs to be on smoothing the vehicular travel. If you want to be friendly to the environment, remember that sitting in traffic idling wastes a bunch of fuel (not to mention the frustration for the drivers).

    normt42 asked 5 months ago

    Thank you for taking the time to provide feedback. In order to account for changes in traffic with future population growth the traffic data used utilized traffic projections for the year 2050

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    In 2013 this was studied and the following decisions made: What changed? "...the emphasis in the preferred design of Colo. 42 — which would pick up a middle turn lane in addition to other traffic flow improvements — is being put on “livability” in the corridor over pure mobility through it. That factor is one of the main reasons the design team backed away from a five-lane solution in favor of a three-lane approach for the highway. The other reason, City Planner Gavin McMillan said, was the fact that expanding the road to five lanes would have required the acquisition — or condemnation — of private property and open space for right-of-way. “The three-lane option is more aligned with what we plan to have there in the future,” McMillan said, “whereas a five-lane option is creating a road that is attempting to move people through at all costs.” He acknowledged that the wider road would shave off an additional 21 seconds of travel time for a motorist moving through the mile-plus corridor but said the loss of pedestrian and bicycle-friendly features to a faster, busier road isn’t worth the saved time."

    michaelm asked about 1 year ago

    Thank you for your comments. We will be sure to document them moving forward. 

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    How will sustainability be addressed and incorporated into the planning and design process?

    Joshua Cooperman asked about 1 year ago
    Thanks for your comments. The corridor plan is evaluating all modes of transportation to allow people to have options based on their desired mode. Other sustainable design options will be evaluated in the process.  
Page last updated: 05 May 2022, 01:33 PM